Street fighting mathematics pdf

 
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Cite as: Sanjoy Mahajan, course materials for / Street-Fighting Mathematics, IAP MIT OpenCourseWare (chronanreareeko.ga), Massachusetts. For a listing of the topics discussed in each session, see here: (PDF) Street- Fighting Mathematics: The Art of Educated Guessing and Opportunistic Problem . Street-Fighting Mathematics: The Art of Educated Guessing and Opportunistic . Our first street-fighting tool is dimensional analysis or, when abbreviated, source was compiled to PDF using ConTeXt and PDFTeX

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Street Fighting Mathematics Pdf

I have read Street-Fighting Mathematics twice and most of the sections five or six times. I find myself working, and struggling with, problems from this book as. PDF | Mahajan, Sanjoy. Street-Fighting Mathematics: The Art of Educated Guessing and Opportunistic Problem Solving (The MIT Press, Cambridge. In Street-Fighting Mathematics, Sanjoy Mahajan builds, sharpens, and Guessing and Opportunistic Problem Solving ยท The Mirror Site (1) - PDF, ePub, Kindle.

This engaging book is an antidote to the rigor mortis brought on by too much mathematical rigor, teaching us how to guess answers without needing a proof or an exact calculation. In problem solving, as in street fighting, rules are for fools: Yet we often fear an unjustified leap even though it may land us on a correct result. Traditional mathematics teaching is largely about solving exactly stated problems exactly, yet life often hands us partly defined problems needing only moderately accurate solutions. In Street-Fighting Mathematics, Sanjoy Mahajan builds, sharpens, and demonstrates tools for educated guessing and down-and-dirty, opportunistic problem solving across diverse fields of knowledge - from mathematics to management. Mahajan describes six tools: Illustrating each tool with numerous examples, he carefully separates the tool - the general principle - from the particular application so that the reader can most easily grasp the tool itself to use on problems of particular interest. Street-Fighting Mathematics grew out of a short course taught by the author at MIT for students ranging from first-year undergraduates to graduate students ready for careers in physics, mathematics, management, electrical engineering, computer science, and biology. They benefited from an approach that avoided rigor and taught them how to use mathematics to solve real problems. Book Site. Street-Fighting Mathematics: Title Street-Fighting Mathematics: English ISBN Book Description This engaging book is an antidote to the rigor mortis brought on by too much mathematical rigor, teaching us how to guess answers without needing a proof or an exact calculation.

Aspiring mathematicians would take a rigorous, proof-based Caclulus course, which would prepare them to tackle harder subjects in the future. Everyone else engineers, chemists, physicists, etc.

Now, all but a handful of universities offer such courses, under the assumption that anyone who wants to be a mathematician has surely taken AP Caclulus. So the idea of proof-based Calc. I was challenged while working through Spviak's book with no teacher guidance in highschool, but I scored a perfect 5 on the AP test with little effort.

In short, the lack of a proof-based class renders students Calc-clueless. I went straight from high school calc into college differential equations because the AP score allowed me. It took a Rudin-based analysis course, much later, for me to appreciate proofs of convergence or epsilon-delta arguments, because my H.

The shock was painful. Eventually though, you learn what you need to know. I have yet to take a course that uses the so-called "terse little blue book from hell". Indeed, although I wonder about people becoming discouraged about being mathematicians simply because they've been misled for so long about what's on the "other side" of college math.

Geometry was mostly just proofs. As was Trigonometry. This was 10 years ago, but those same teachers are still at my old school.

Presumably they teach the same material. I guess this is atypical? That's too bad, because those trig proofs were actually kinda fun. I think for most of us the better question is: How soon do you start forgetting all the required details about integrals I started doing integrals on my own when I was 14 grade 9 , but my classmates didn't learn about integrals until grade This was in Italy however, and I'm not sure about when they're introduced to students in the States.

I can tell you though, that a first year undergraduate student at a scientific faculty shouldn't be overly worried about approaching a book like this. How did you arrive to that number? The text seems to have many exercise problem.

I was expecting an answer like '2 months, going with an hour a day'. At any rate, thanks. Even solving a few problems here and there, it's hard to imagine you'd proceed at a slower pace than that.

That said, I didn't see that each chapter has a bunch of extra problems at the end. These may take you extra time. I still believe that it's a few weeks project at best, not months.

A highly recommended read. Not to spoil anyone's fun but gems like this abound: A valid economic argument cannot reach a conclusion that depends on the astronomical phenomenon chosen to measure time. Looks great! Now can someone get me more hours in the day?

Street-Fighting Mathematics

Unless you are a very unique case, you'll should be able squeeze a book this size into your daily life. Let's assume that given the content and the font-size, an average HN reader would require an hour to read 10 pages that's underestimating most people's reading speed of course. Then the book would require, on average, about 12 hours to read. If you dedicate 2 hours a day to it, you'll have finished it before the week is over.

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If you take the time to solve all the problems presented, it may take you a few more weeks, but it's not a major project like reading and doing all the exercises from SICP.

This issue isn't so much the time to read the book as the time to read all the books I want to read. I know the answer to the last question probably depends, but hopefully a ball mark estimate can be given acangiano on July 26, It looks like an understanding of Calculus and basic Physics is all that is required to read this book. Ballkpark estimate how ironic, having to do a ballpark estimation before having read a book on how to do ballpark estimates : between 10 and 30 hours.

When do you people in the US start to learn about integrals? Is it expected that a first-year undergraduate student already has the knowledge to understand the book? I don't have the required "prerequisites" as the GP puts it to understand the book, but I should : and it might shame me into studying a bit : then again, I probably won't golwengaud on July 26, Single integrals are freshman calculus, which is nominally taught in the first year of university.

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Thanks for the answers. For all the flak US education receives, the option of taking AP classes sounds good and it gives college credits, which is even better! This is utterly derailing the main topic of conversation, but I know that a lot of mathematicians dislike AP Calculus. The original thinking was that Calculus couldn't be taught to highschoolers, so you waited until University to take it.

Aspiring mathematicians would take a rigorous, proof-based Caclulus course, which would prepare them to tackle harder subjects in the future. Everyone else engineers, chemists, physicists, etc. Now, all but a handful of universities offer such courses, under the assumption that anyone who wants to be a mathematician has surely taken AP Caclulus.

Street-Fighting Mathematics - Download link

So the idea of proof-based Calc. I was challenged while working through Spviak's book with no teacher guidance in highschool, but I scored a perfect 5 on the AP test with little effort. I went straight from high school calc into college differential equations because the AP score allowed me.

It took a Rudin-based analysis course, much later, for me to appreciate proofs of convergence or epsilon-delta arguments, because my H. The shock was painful. Eventually though, you learn what you need to know.